I Sewed a Raincoat! | Seamwork Francis + 1000Gage Waterproof Fabric Sewing Pattern Review


You know how sometimes you see a fabric and you just know exactly what it's going to be? You know the pattern and the details and all the things you're going to do to make it exactly what you see in your mind?


Well that happened to me when I saw this fabric from 1000Gage. I'll show you around there site here in a sec, but first, Be sure to like this video so other people will see it, subscribe, and click the bell if you want to be notified every time I post a video! Videos highlighting my makes and sewing pattern reviews go up every Monday. I already have dozens for you to watch if you want to binge. Check out the playlist in the top, right corner of your screen. It opens in a new tab so you won't lose your place here!


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OK. Back to my jacket ... I'm sure you haven't heard of this online fabric shop before so let me show you around their site and point out why I love them so much.

They design, produce and distribute all of their fabrics themselves. This obviously has lots of benefits to the consumer including affordable prices by cutting out the middle man. But, my favorite benefit of this is that you can get the same print in multiple different substrates.


So, when I saw they had waterproof fabrics, I knew I wanted to make a raincoat. And, when I saw they had the same print of one of the fabrics I loved in a brushed cotton, a little idea of a winter raincoat came to mind. Something that would be warm enough to wear in the winter but still protect from the rain. I've never seen two fabrics with the same print before and I was so excited to see my idea come to life.


I ended up using the waterproof fabric for the entire shell, duh. And used the brushed cotton for the hood lining and belt. If I could do it again, I'd also use the brushed cotton for the front facing, but that can be our little secret. I didn't want to use the brushed cotton for hte whole lining though because we have pretty mild winters here and I knew I'd be wearing this jacket over sweaters and though the two fabrics would stick together. So, regular lining went in the sleeves and the body of the jacket.


On the day that I filmed this video, it was raining and in the low 60s so it was a great test to see if my idea would actually hold up. And, you know what? My ears were very warm when I had the hood up! haha.


I will have another video later this week with tips on how to sew with waterproof fabric. It's really simple, you just have to keep a few things in mind. One of them is how to handle your seam allowances to ensure they lie flat. I ended up topstitching mine. Which I think gives this jacket a cool casual vibe.


The fabric itself is a cotton fabric with a thin film of laminate over the top. The wrong side is still cotton, so, you can iron the wrong-side of the fabric, but if two laminate sides touch, the iron will melt them together. So, you just have to be supppper careful when pressing anything. I used a pressing cloth almost every time.


The pattern I used is Seamwork's Francis Coat. Their website describes it as a timeless silhouette, perfect for your favorite denim, twill, or coatings. It’s fully lined, with details that are satisfying to sew and will make you feel very proud when you’re all finished.

Fish-eye darts provide gentle shaping on the back, and the curvy size range features bust darts for additional shaping. In-seam pockets, a spread collar with a partial stand, and a sharp button placket add polish, and a waist belt finishes this classic silhouette.


Did you catch that? Fisheye darts in the back! Of a coat! You know I love that so much! I am on the high end of the missy size range, so I didn't add the bodice darts, but I love that that is an option. I did end up making a straight size 16 though even though my bust fit into a 12. Seamwork patterns are notorious for small bodices, mostly in the armcye and shoulders, so that partnered with the fact that i knew I'd be wearing this over sweaters made me feel comfortable in sewing a jacket that might run a little big through the top.